DCU and me, baby

Essays, Art, Videos - all on the subject of comics

Martha Wayne being a bad-ass mom.

These pages are just meant to illustrate a point I wanted to make in response to (and agreement with) this post.

I think, historically, it has been true that Martha ends up being played off as more of a “how horrible it was to lose a mother!” scenario than “how horrible it was to lose that mother, of all mothers!” - which is what we should be feeling.

I think jamesthefourth and Scott Snyder did a fine job of portraying Martha as a real person in unexpected ways during the City of the Owls storyline and especially the backups featuring Jarvis Pennyworth (which were actually my favourite part of that story).

She’s presented as a woman who has to fight for the opportunity to be charitable in a world that wants to let those less fortunate simply go unheeded. She comes off as a mother to Bruce - a busy mother, but a caring mother. She’s a little sassy, which is what I meant by unexpected.

She seemed real.

I’d like to see more of that in future depictions of Martha Wayne, and I’d like to see more of her in general. Especially her relationship with the Kane family. That is an area that hasn’t been explored deeply enough.

The examples above come from the backups in Batman #9 and #10 of the New 52 series, with lovely art by Rafael Albuquerque.

espanolbot:

Martha Wayne needs to be in more comics. A lot of writers seem to focus more upon Bruce’s dad Thomas, with Martha forming a nebulous Mum Cloud, on the basis that Thomas was a doctor and a defacto aristocrat and thus influenced a lot of Bruce’s personality in a “help people and be socially responsible with your wealth” kind of way, but there have been numerous portrayals of Martha that show her impact on Bruce too.

For example, in Paul Dini’s Streets of Gotham series, they actually explore the beginnings of Martha and Thomas’ relationship and how it was her influence that caused Thomas to actually START being the socially responsible person he later became. In addition to giving her an actual personality and backstory.

Or in Geoff John’s Batman: Earth One they merge her with the Arkham family, and make her an advocate for the mentally ill in addition to trying Bruce directly to what would later become Arkham Asylum.

A lot of the time writers instead seem to focus more on the fact that she was killed rather than her life… which is actually kind of depressing. In Greg Rucka’s Death and the Maidens, for example, when his parents’ ghosts/hallucinations claiming to be ghosts appear Martha has most of her face shot off as that’s the only way Bruce can remember hero. Or in Grant Morrison’s Batman run where she doesn’t appear at all, but is used more as a pawn by her family (who think Thomas was a bad influence) or as a means to hurt Bruce (faking evidence that she was a drug addict who Thomas pimped out to his friends).

Martha Wayne can and has been a very interesting character in her own right, but we’re in a situation where she’s left more in the background. Like in Batman Begins I don’t even think that she had any lines, with all Bruce’s parental advice coming from his Dad or Alfred.

Which, again, is kind of depressing.

Martha Wayne one-shot, evilmarguerite.
Pitch it til your arm hurts.


I think, historically, it has been true that Martha ends up being played off as more of a “how horrible it was to lose a mother!” scenario than “how horrible it was to lose that mother, of all mothers!” - which is what we should be feeling.

I think jamesthefourth and Scott Snyder did a fine job of portraying Martha as a real person in unexpected ways during the City of the Owls storyline and especially the backups featuring Jarvis Pennyworth (which were actually my favourite part of that story).

She’s presented as a woman who has to fight for the opportunity to be charitable in a world that wants to let those less fortunate simply go unheeded. She comes off as a mother to Bruce - a busy mother, but a caring mother. She’s a little sassy, which is what I meant by unexpected.

She seemed real.

I’d like to see more of that in future depictions of Martha Wayne, and I’d like to see more of her in general. Especially her relationship with the Kane family. That is an area that hasn’t been explored deeply enough.

(via evilmarguerite)

Cover art for Harley Quinn #10 by Amanda Conner with Paul Mounts.

Cover art for Harley Quinn #10 by Amanda Conner with Paul Mounts.

brianmichaelbendis:

Batman, Green Arrow, and the Question poster by Denys Cowan & Bill Sienkiewicz.This piece was created for a retail poster to promote the 1988 three-part “Fables” story arc that ran through Detective Annual #1, Green Arrow Annual #1, and Question Annual #1.

brianmichaelbendis:

Batman, Green Arrow, and the Question poster by Denys Cowan & Bill Sienkiewicz.

This piece was created for a retail poster to promote the 1988 three-part “Fables” story arc that ran through Detective Annual #1, Green Arrow Annual #1, and Question Annual #1.

(Source: alexhchung, via evilmarguerite)

The greatest source of pathos in any Batman story, beyond the death of his parents, is Alfred’s futile hope that he’ll give up the cowl.